Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Looking For Work As A Freelance Writer

I'm sure some people think I live a privileged existence as a self employed worker - bumming around the house in my PJ's, getting up when I like, flexible hours etc. Working for myself does have it's advantages (maybe I'll cover that in another blog post), but it's also like you're on a constant cycle of looking for work! especially in the quiet times in between projects, when the fear of the unknown creeps in, and you think you may never work again!

It's impossible to have my eyes everywhere, and my brain honing in on every possible avenue I could look down, or use to find new connections and opportunities, but having my virtual ears pricked is something I think I'm pretty good at.

I'm on a few Facebook groups for journalism and copywriting, and they are useful for writer shout-outs for articles, jobs, and possible networking opportunities. For me these groups work best for those reasons, and if I just happen to come across a useful tip, resource, or piece of advice I hadn't thought of. If I'm honest though sometimes when I have posted, the resulting comments have been a bit 'obvious' - i.e. suggesting I contact past clients.

Twitter is also a must, but for slightly different reasons, for me this is the public place to be seen, and to show what I can do, what I know and am passionate about, and to build relationships with people in the field. Showing genuine interest in something goes a long way! I've found a few things/people to write about recently on there who I am still in touch with, whereas I prefer to keep my Facebook profile private, and for who I know.

It's also worth playing around with hashtags and search terms as well. It's worth keeping an eye on general ones such as #journorequest, prrequest, journalism job etc, but adding some specifics can also give good results, such as copywriter job uk, freelance writer job, content agency Essex, content editor remote (if you're looking for homebased work).

Here's a few other things I'd suggest:

1) Keep your eyes on job sites, even if you see a position advertised that isn't for you, if the organisation, publication etc. has captured your interest, make sure you read the fine print of the advert - I've seen 'commission freelance writers' a fair few times in job descriptions, so have added them to my contact list.

2) Advertise your availability, but with care - I personally have no problem writing little adverts reminding people I'm about, or highlighting certain things, but I think they have to be done in the right way. Talk about a recent project you've done (are you looking for similar?), show your keen to make new connections and broaden your experience, but don't appear over keen, or highlight any quiet times in a negative way. Use your time constructively.

3) Think outside the box - apart from a typical media job, project, pitch - where else could your writing skills benefit people, and how could you combine these with your other passions/hobbies/knowledge. I love craft, and have been lucky enough to be chosen for 2 design teams, and been published a couple of times in that area, so I have started to do a little advertising targeted towards craft businesses and start-ups who might need help with content. It helps with the cold calling element as well if you are confident in your knowledge.

If you are self employed, what do you suggest for finding work and advertising yourself? It's not always easy to realise your strengths and get out there, and keep going through freelance ups and downs, so if you have any tips please share them below.

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